References

Here are the references from the Teaching Tech-Savvy Kids book.

©Corwin Press 2010

Chapter 1

  • Baron, N. (2008). Always on: Language in an online and mobile world. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.
  • Buckingham, D. (2007). Beyond technology: Children’s learning in the age of digital culture. Cambridge, England: Polity Press.
  • Burbules, N. & Callister, T. (2000). Watch IT: The risks and promises of information technologies for education. Boulder, CO: Westview Press.
  • Ito, M., Baumer, S., Bittanti, M., boyd, d., Cody, R., et al., (2008). Hanging out, messing around, and geeking out: Kids living and learning with new media. The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Series on Digital Media and Learning. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. Download the report at http://digitalyouth.ischool.berkeley.edu/
  • Jenkins, H. (with Clinton, K., Purushotma, R., Robison, A., and Weigel, M.). (2006). Confronting the challenges of participatory culture: Education for the 21st century. The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. Retrieved from http://digitallearning.macfound.org
  • MacArthur Foundation. Re-Imagining learning in the 21st century.
  • Moll, L., Amanti, C., Neff, D., & Gonzalez, N. (1992). Funds of knowledge for teaching: Using a qualitative approach to connect homes and classrooms. Theory Into Practice, 31(2), 132–141.
  • Pew Research Center. (2010). Millennials. A portrait of generation next. Confident. Connected. Open to change. (P. Taylor and S. Keeter, Eds.)> Retrieved March 24, 2010, from http://pewresearch.or/millennials
  • Street, B. (1995). Social literacies. London: Longman.

Chapter 2

Chapter 3

  • Beatham, M. (2008–2009). Tools of inquiry: Separating tool and task to promote true learning. Journal of Educational Technology Systems, 37(1), 61–70.
  • Buckingham, D. (2003). Media education: Literacy, learning, and contemporary culture. Cambridge, England: Polity Press.
  • Carrington, V., and Robinson, M. (2009). Digital literacies: Social learning and classroom practices. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.
  • Center for Social Media: http://www.centerforsocialmedia.org
  • Creative Commons: http://creativecommons.org/
  • Cuban, L. (1986). Teachers and machines: The classroom use of technology since 1920. New York: Teachers College Press.
  • Digital Ethnography at Kansas State University: http://mediatedcultures.net/youtube.htm
  • Hodson, R. (2007). Video Blogging and Activism. Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1aB2FmeWUdw
  • Ito, M., Bittanti, M., boyd, d., Herr-Stephenson, B., Horst, H.A., Lange, P.A. (2008). Living and learning with new media: Summary of findings from the digital youth project. The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Series on Digital Media and Learning. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. Download the report at http://digitalyouth.ischool.berkeley.edu/
  • Ito, M., Baumer, S., Bittanti, M., boyd, d., Cody, R., et al., (2010). Hanging out, messing around, and geeking out: Kids living and learning with new media. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
  • Jenkins, H. (2009). What happened before YouTube. In J. Burgess, J. Green. (Eds.). YouTube: Online Video and Participatory Culture. (pp. 109–125). Cambridge, MA: Polity Press.
  • Jenkins, H. (with Clinton, K., Purushotma, R., Robison, A., and Weigel, M.). (2006). Confronting the challenges of participatory culture: Education for the 21st century. The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. Retrieved August 18, 2007 from http://digitallearning.macfound.org
  • Lange, P. G. (2007a). Searching for the ‘You’ in ‘YouTube’: An analysis of Online Response Ability.National Association of Practicing Anthropology Proceedings of the Ethnographic Praxis in Industry Conference 2007. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press: 31–45. Retrieved from http://www.epic2007.com/Draft-EPIC2007-Proceedings.pdf
  • Lange, P. G. (2007b). Commenting on comments: Investigating responses to antagonism on YouTube. presented at the Society for Applied Anthropology, Annual Conference, March 31, 2007 in Tampa, Florida. Retrieved from http://sfaapodcasts.files.wordpress.com/2007/04/update-apr-17-lange-sfaa-paper-2007.pdf
  • Silverstone, R. (2007). Media and morality: On the rise of the mediapolis. Cambridge, England: Polity Press.
  • The Institute for Multimedia Literacy (IML) at the University of Southern California: http://iml.usc.edu/index.php/resources-articles/2008/09/07/a-pedagogy-for-original-synners/
  • Truffaut, F. (Director). (1973). Day for night or La nuit Américaine [Motion picture]. France. Warner Bros. Pictures.
  • Verdi, M., Hodson, R., Weynand, D., Craig, S. (2006). Secrets of video blogging. Berkeley, CA: Peachpit Press. Also visit Ryanne and Michael’s Web site at http://www.freevlog.org
  • Voicethread: http://voicethread.com/#home
  • WordPress: http://wordpress.com
  • YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/YouTubeHelp
  • YouTube Education: http://www.youtube.com/education?b=1

Chapter 4

Chapter 5

  • Beach, R., Anson, C., Breuch, L., and Swiss, T. (2008). Teaching writing using blogs, wikis, and other digital tools. Norwood, MA: Christopher-Gordon Publishers. Also visit the wiki designed to support the book: http://digitalwriting.pbworks.com/
  • Black, R. (2008). Adolescents and online fan fiction. New York: Peter Lang Publishing.
  • Bledsoe, G. L. (2009). Collaborative digital writing: The art of writing together using technology. In A. Herrington, K. Hodgson, and C. Moran (Eds.). Teaching the new writing: Technology, change, and assessment in the 21st-century classroom. (pp. 39–54). New York and Berkeley: Teachers College Press and National Writing Project.
  • Blogger: https://www.blogger.com/start
  • Bowker, G. C. (2005). Memory practices in the sciences. Cambridge: MIT Press.
  • Buckingham, D. (Ed.) (2007). Youth, identity, and digital media. The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Series on Digital Media and Learning. Boston: MIT Press.
  • Curie, M. (1903). Radioactive substances. London: Edwin John Davey.
  • Dyson, A. H. (2003). The brothers and sisters learn to write: Popular literacies in childhood and school cultures. New York: Teachers College Press.
  • Fan Fiction Archives: http://www.fanfiction.nethttp://www.fictionalley.org,http://www.harrypotterfanfiction.com
  • Fleischer, S., Wright, S., and Barnes, M. (2007). Dungeons, dragons, and discretion: A gateway to gaming, technology, and literacy. In C. Selfe and G.Hawisher (Eds.), Gaming lives in the twenty-first century: Literate connections. (pp. 143–160). New York: Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Goodall, J. (1971). In the shadow of man. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Publishing.
  • Griffiths, A. K., & Barman, C. R. (1995) High school students’ views about the nature of science: Results from three countries. School Science and Mathematics, 95, 248–356.
  • Henry Jenkins’ blog: Confessions of an aca-fanhttp://www.henryjenkins.org/. Search for Fan Fiction. (Both Becky and Jessica subscribe to this blog!)
  • Jenkins, H. (with Clinton, K., Purushotma, R., Robison, A., and Weigel, M.). (2006a). Confronting the challenges of participatory culture: Education for the 21st century. The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. Retrieved August 18, 2007 from http://digitallearning.macfound.org
  • Jenkins, H. (2006b). Fans, bloggers, and gamers: Media consumers in a digital age. New York: NYU Press.
  • Latour, B. (1987). Science in action. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.
  • Lederman, N. G. (1992). Students’ and teachers’ conceptions about the nature of science: A review of the research. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 29, 331–359.
  • Lemke, J. (1990). Talking science: Language, learning, and values. Westport, CT: Ablex Publishing.
  • Lewis, C., Enciso, P., & Moje, E. (2007). Reframing sociocultural research on literacy: Identity, agency, and power. Mahway, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.
  • Niaz, M., & Rodriguez, M. A. (2000). Teaching chemistry as rhetoric of conclusions or heuristic principles—A history and philosophy of science perspective. Chemistry education: Research and practice in Europe, 1(3), 315–322.
  • Popper, K. R. (1959). The logic of scientific discovery. London: Hutchinson.
  • Richardson, W. (2006). Blogs, wikis, podcasts, and other powerful Web tools for classrooms. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin.
  • Twitter: https://twitter.com/
  • WordPress: http://wordpress.org
  • Yahoo!: http://www.yahoo.com

Chapter 6

  • Education Arcade: http://www.educationarcade.org
  • Educause. (2008). 7 things you should know about Second Life. Educause Learning Initiative. Retrieved from http://www.educause.edu/ELI/7ThingsYouShouldKnowAboutSecon/163004.
  • Foreman, N., Boyd-Davis, S., Moar, M., Korallo, L., & Chappell, E. (2007). Can virtual environments enhance the learning of historical chronology? Instructional Science: An International Journal of the Learning Sciences, 36(2), 155–173.
  • Freire, P. (1970). Pedagogy of the oppressed. New York: Continuum.
  • Gee, J. P. (2003). What video games have to teach us about learning and literacy. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Gee, J. P. (2005) Learning by design: Good video games as learning machines. E-Learning, 2(1), 5–15.
  • Gee, J. P. (2007). Good video games and good learning: Collected essays on video games, learning, and literacy. New York: Peter Lang Publishing.
  • Ito, M. (2007). Education Vs. entertainment: A cultural history of children’s software. In K. Salen (Ed.),The ecology of games: Connecting youth, games, and learning. (pp. 89–116). The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Series on Digital Media and Learning. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
  • Jenkins, H. (2006). The war between effects and meaning: Rethinking the video game violence debate. In D. Buckingham and R. Willett (Eds.), Digital generations: Children, young people, and new media.(pp. 19–32). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.
  • Lave, J., & Wenger, E. (1991). Situated learning: Legitimate peripheral participation. Cambridge, England: University Press.
  • Moll, L., Amanti, C., Neff, D., & Gonzalez, N. (1992). Funds of knowledge for teaching: Using a qualitative approach to connect homes and classrooms. Theory Into Practice, 31(2), 132–141.
  • National Research Council and the Institute of Medicine. (2004). Engaging schools: Fostering high school students’ motivation to learn. Committee on Increasing High School Students’ Engagement and Motivation to Learn. Board on Children, Youth, and Families, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: National Academic Press.
  • Nelson, B. C. (2007). Exploring the use of individualized, reflective guidance in an educational multiuser virtual environment. Journal of Science Education and Technology, 16(1), 83–97.
  • RezEd: The Hub for Learning and Virtual Worlds: http://www.rezed.org
  • Salen, K. (2007). Toward an ecology of gaming. In K. Salen (Ed.), The ecology of games: Connecting youth, games, and learning. The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Series on Digital Media and Learning. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
  • Shaffer, D. W. (2006). How computer games help children learn. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Squire, K. (2006). From content to context: Videogames as designed experience. Educational Researcher, 35(8), 19–29.
  • Warren, S. J., Dondlinger, M. J., & Barab, S. A. (2008). A MUVE toward PBL writing: Effects of a digital learning environment designed to improve elementary student writing. Journal of Research on Technology in Education, 41(1), 113–140.
  • Wenger, E. (1998) Communities of practice: Learning meaning and identity. Cambridge, England: University Press.

Chapter 7

  • Clinton, K., McWilliams, J., Jenkins, H., Kolos, H. (2010). Reading in a participatory culture: A model for expanding the ELA domain by bringing in new media mindsets and practices. Project New Media. Work in progress.
  • Coppa, F. (2008). Women, Star Trek and the early development of fannish vidding. Transformative Works and Cultures (Vol. 1). Retrieved from http://journal.transformativeworks.org/index.php/twc/article/view/44/64
  • Driscoll, K. (2009). Stepping your game up: Technical innovation among young people of color in hip-hop (Master’s thesis MIT). Comparative Media Studies.
  • Ito, M., Baumer, S., Bittani, M., boyd, d., Cody, R., Herr-Shephardson, B., Horst, H. A., Lange, P. A., Mahendran, D., Martinez, K., Pascoe, C. J., Perkel, D., Robinson, L., Sims, C., Tripp, L. (2010).Hanging out, messing around, and geeking out: Kids living and learning with new media. Cambridge: MIT Press.
  • Jenkins, H. (2006). Learning by remixing. Media Shift. Retrieved from http://www.pbs.org/mediashift/2006/07/learning-by-remixing194.html
  • Jenkins, H. (with Purushotma, R., Weigel, M., Clinton, K., and Robison, A. J.) (2009). Confronting the challenges of participatory culture: Media education for the 21st century. Cambridge: Macarthur/MIT Press. Retrieved from http://newmedialiteracies.org/NMLWhitePaper.pdf
  • Kelley, W. (2008). Reading Moby-Dick through the decades. Expert Voices, Reading in a Participatory Culture, Teacher’s Strategy Guide, Project New Media Literacies.
  • Lankshear, C., & Knobel, M. (2006). New literacies: Changing knowledge in the classroom. London: Open University Press.
  • Lenhart, A., & Madden, M. (2005). Teen content creators and consumers. Pew Internet & American Life Project. Available at http://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2005/Teen-Content-Creators-and-Consumers.aspx
  • Lenhart, A., & Madden, M. (2007). Teens and social media. Pew Internet & American Life Project. Available at http://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2007/Teens-and-Social-Media.aspx
  • Lombana, A. (2007). Appropriation, transformation and remix: Cut-ups. Exemplar Library lesson.
  • McLuhan, M. (1994). Understanding media: The extensions of man. New York: McGraw-Hill.
  • McWilliams, J., Lui, D., & Clinton, K. (2008). Motives for reading. Teacher’s strategy guide: Reading in a participatory culture, Project New Media Literacies.
  • Pitts-Wiley, R. (2008). Reading Moby-Dick as a creative artist. Expert Voices, Reading in a Participatory Culture, Teacher’s Strategy Guide. Project New Media Literacies.
  • Our Space: Being a Responsible Citizen of the Digital World (a collaboration with Harvard’s GoodPlay Project)
  • Pryor, T. (2008). Hip-hop. Retrieved January 14, 2008, from http://worldmusic.nationalgeographic.com/worldmusic/view/page.basic/genre/content.genre/hip_hop_730
  • Rauschenberg, R. (1964). Retroactive I. [Oil and silkscreen ink on canvas]. Wadsworth Athenuem, Hartford, Connecticut.
  • Thompson, C. (2009). The new literacy. Retrieved from http://www.wired.com/techbiz/people/magazine/17-09/st_thompson?showAllComments=true

Chapter 8

  • Beatham, M. (2008–2009). Tools of inquiry: Separating tool and task to promote true learning. Journal of Educational Technology Systems, 37(1), 61–70.
  • Hull, G., & Schultz, K. (Eds.). (2002). School’s out: Bridging out-of-school literacies with classroom practice. New York: Teachers College Press.
  • Ito, M. (2008). Why time spent online is important for teen development. Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=58X7YPebJVo
  • Ito, M., Horst, H. A., Bittanti, M., boyd, d., Herr-Stephenson, B., Lange, P. G., Pascoe, C., J., & Robinson, L. (with Baumer, S., Cody, R., Mahendran, D., Martínez, K., Perkel, D., Sims, C., & Tripp, L.). (2008). Living and learning with new media: Summary findings from the Digital Youth Project. The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Report on Digital Media and Learning. Download the report at http://digitalyouth.ischool.berkeley.edu/report
  • Jenkins, H. (with Clinton, K., Purushotma, R., Robison, A., and Weigel, M.). (2006). Confronting the challenges of participatory culture: Education for the 21st century. The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. Retrieved from http://digitallearning.macfound.org
  • Kleiman, G. (2003). Myths and realities about technology in K–12 schools. In D. Gordon (Ed.), The digital class: How technology is changing the way we teach and learn. (pp. 7–15). Cambridge, MA: Harvard Education Letter.
  • National Research Council and the Institute of Medicine. (2004). Engaging schools: Fostering high school students’ motivation to learn. Committee on Increasing High School Students’ Engagement and Motivation to Learn. Board on Children, Youth, and Families, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Washington, DC: National Academic Press.
  • Oseas, A. (2003). Introduction: An invitation to ask ,“What if . . .?” In D. Gordon (Ed.), The digital classroom: How technology is changing the way we teach and learn. (pp. 3–6). Cambridge, MA: The Harvard Education Letter.
  • Tucker, A. (2008). Transforming schools with technology: How smart use of digital tools helps achieve six key education goals. Cambridge, MA: Harvard Education Press.

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